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The U.S. Supreme Court Is Marching in Lockstep with the Police State

Worth reading it all. Summary is below. rutherford.org:

A review of the Supreme Court’s rulings over the past 10 years, including some critical ones this term, reveals a startling and steady trend towards pro-police state rulings by an institution concerned more with establishing order and protecting government agents than with upholding the rights enshrined in the Constitution.

Police officers can use lethal force in car chases without fear of lawsuits. 

Police officers can stop cars based only on “anonymous” tips.

Secret Service agents are not accountable for their actions, as long as they’re done in the name of security.

Citizens only have a right to remain silent if they assert it.

Police have free reign to use drug-sniffing dogs as “search warrants on leashes,” justifying any and all police searches of vehicles stopped on the roadside.

Police can forcibly take your DNA, whether or not you’ve been convicted of a crime.

Police can stop, search, question and profile citizens and non-citizens alike.

Police can subject Americans to virtual strip searches, no matter the “offense.”

A win for privacy: High Court rules against police cell phone snooping | Absolute Rights

At absoluterights.com:

In a ruling that helps restore at least a modicum of constitutional privacy and due process protections in the digital age, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that police must first obtain a search warrant before snooping through suspects’ cell phones.

Police agencies argued that searching through a cell phone was no different than asking someone to empty their pockets, but the high court – unanimously – rejected that, saying a cell phone is fundamentally different.

In writing for the court, Chief Justice John Roberts found:

The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought. Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple— get a warrant.

Roberts also noted that today’s cell phone technology is capable of keeping a person’s entire life in digital storage – pictures, documents, even medical records and other private materials – which makes it subject to Fourth Amendment protections.

Roberts said cell phones could lay bare someone’s entire personal history, from their medical records to their “specific movements down to the minute.”

The Washington Times further reported:

Minority Report? Researchers use Twitter to predict crime

Predicting crime before it happens. Is the next step to arrest before the crime? phys.org:

Hidden in the Twittersphere are nuggets of information that could prove useful to crime fighters—even before a crime has been committed.

Researchers at the University of Virginia demonstrated  could predict certain kinds of  if the correct analysis is applied.

A research paper published in the scientific journal Decision Support Systems last month said the analysis of geo-tagged tweets can be useful in predicting 19 to 25 kinds of crimes, especially for offenses such as stalking, thefts and certain kinds of assault.

The results are surprising, especially when one considers that people rarely tweet about crimes directly, said lead researcher Matthew Gerber of the university's Predictive Technology Lab.

Gerber said even tweets that have no direct link to crimes may contain information about activities often associated with them.

"What people are tweeting about are their routine activities," Gerber told AFP. "Those routine activities take them into environments where crime is likely to happen.

"So if I tweet about getting drunk tonight, and a lot of people are talking about getting drunk, we know there are certain crimes associated with those things that produce crimes. It's indirect."

US Post Office Is in the Market for Ammo

Seen at moonbattery.com:

The US Post Office is not a law enforcement agency. So why does it need assorted small arms ammunition?

post-office-ammo

Oh, I get why. For the same reason that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration needs 72,000 rounds of .40 caliber ammo, the National Weather Service needs 46,000 rounds of the same, the Social Security Administration needs 174,000 rounds, and the Department of Education needs to blow $80,000 on Glocks and $17,000 on shotguns.

Know your rights when interacting with police

At theblaze.com:

Here Are All the Rights You Have When Interacting With a Police Officer

Online-Paralegal-Programs.com

NSA and the Police State

zerohedge.com:

Bill Binney is the high-level NSA executive who created the agency’s mass surveillance program for digital information.  A 32-year NSA veteran widely regarded as a “legend” within the agency, Binney was the senior technical director within the agency and managed thousands of NSA employees.

U.S. Cover-up of Saudi 9/11 Ties Probed

Breathing new life into 9/11 conspiracy theory.  Read more at judicialwatch.org:

The U.S. government’s cover-up of a Saudi connection in the 9/11 terrorist attacks is receiving new attention because a pair of legislators—one Republican, one Democrat—recently viewed a redacted chunk of a congressional report that confirms foreign state involvement in the plot.

Americans have been told that Al Qaeda acted alone on September 11, 2001 and that there were no state sponsors. In fact, the George W. Bush administration blacked out dozens of pages of a congressional investigative report on 9/11 that dealt with specific sources of foreign support for the 19 hijackers, most of whom were Saudi nationals.

Judicial Watch quickly launched an investigation and in 2005 obtained shocking documents from the FBI detailing how well-connected Saudis, including relatives of Osama bin Laden, left the U.S. on specially chartered flights while most air traffic was still grounded. In all, 160 subjects of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including but not limited to members of the House of Saud and/or members of the bin Laden family fled the U.S. between September 11, 2001 and September 15, 2001.

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